By – Armaan Khan

Fatal Shot

Reality Show: Fatal Shot places you in the role of a nameless police detective assigned to figure out why a man died during the filming of The Fright Reality Show. The victim’s wife, Sarah, believes he was murdered by the show’s producer and uncovered evidence to prove it, but that evidence has been stolen. Now her life is in danger and It is up to you to bring the guilty parties to justice before she ends up dead as well.  Of course, things are not so simple as that. As you work through the game, the plot will twist and turn in a way that is engaging without being predictable. The story didn’t keep me on the edge of my seat or anything, but was entertaining enough that I played it from start to finish without a break.

Fatal Shot

Big Fish classifies Reality Show: Fatal Shot as a hidden object game, but it has no hidden object sequences at all. That makes the game a traditional adventure, although it does stick to most of the formula established by HOGs. You’ll explore around beautifully painted rooms, solve simple lock-and-key puzzles, and play the occasional mini-game.  Those mini-games cover the genre’s usual gamut. There’s a lot of tile-manipulation stuff—rotating, sliding, swapping—but there are also a few that go beyond convention. One, in which you have to push boxes through a maze was particularly entertaining, as was another where you have to direct current by building electrical circuits. You won’t encounter anything that’s particularly challenging, but most are fun and do a good job of balancing gameplay while keeping the story moving forward.

Fatal Shot

Some of the mini-games do get tedious, however. One, in which you move a yeti through a castle is overly simple and takes forever due to the slowness of the yeti. Another, where you have to start an elevator, can only be solved through trial and error. I eventually had to consult the included strategy guide to figure that one out.   Fortunately, there is a skip button that charges up during mini-games, and once it’s ready you can use it to bypass anything that bores or stumps you. Yes, it also provides a cheap method to finishing the game, but I’m okay with that. The feature came in handy to get past a tile rotation game that was aggravating me due to unresponsive controls, and that alone makes it worth having around.  Other extras that come with the Collector’s Edition—which is the only edition available for purchase, by the way—include wallpapers, screensavers, music files, and a bonus chapter that unlocks once you beat the main game. The bonus chapter was interesting, more so because it laid the foundation for future games in the series than anything else.

Fatal Shot

Conclusion—Is It Worth The Money?

Overall, I enjoyed my time with Reality Show: Fatal Shot Collector’s Edition. All things considered, however, the twenty dollar price tag is more than it’s worth. If it were half that price, I’d tell you to buy it for sure.

Reality Show: Fatal Shot Technical Summary

  • Time Played—3.5 hours (3 for main game, 0.5 for bonus chapter)
  • Widescreen Support—Partial. Selecting widescreen mode replaces the black bars on the side with a decorative border. The interactive area remains 4:3 as a result.
  • Resolution Played—1280×720
  • FOV Slider—N/A
  • 5.1 Audio Support—No
  • Bugs/Crashes Encountered—None
  • Control Scheme—Mouse
  • DRM—Big Fish Games Manager
  • System Specs— Core i5@2.7GHz, 8GB RAM, Radeon HD 6770M 512MB
  • Game Acquisition Method—Review Copy
  • Availability—Big Fish Games
  • Demo—Yes, 60 minute trial.
  • Saved Game Location—“C:\Users\%USERNAME%\AppData\Roaming\ERS Game Studios\Reality Show – Fatal Shot CE\”

 

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